Island History

Home|Island History

James S. Casey: Fishers Island’s First Resident Photographer

By |2020-05-28T18:10:22-04:00May 28th, 2020|Island History, Photo Gallery|

James S. Casey’s cottage and photography studio, Fishers Island, N.Y., circa 1918. This cottage is today painted a distinctive blue and sits at the base of the hill across from the former Grebe/Stern house. James S. Casey: Fishers Island’s First Resident Photographer James S. Casey, Fishers Island’s first resident photographer, lived in

Claypit Views and Brickyard Maps

By |2020-05-28T13:53:00-04:00May 28th, 2020|Island History, Photo Gallery|

Claypit Views and Brickyard Maps From The History of Brickmaking on Fishers Island At its height in the 1880s, the brickyard on Fishers Island was one of the largest in the Northeast—some claimed the entire country—with a production capacity of 18 million bricks per annum.

Island History: Fishers Island in the Revolutionary War

By |2020-06-02T16:27:43-04:00May 2nd, 2020|Island History, Newsletter 2020|

ISLAND HISTORY Fishers Island in the Revolutionary War by Pierce Rafferty “Genl. Howe Evacuating Boston,” engraving by J. Godfrey, circa 1861. Museum Collection. The first rumblings of the American Revolution reached our shores in late May 1773, some six months before the Boston Tea Party. According to an account published in a

Remembering the Mystic Isle

By |2020-05-16T20:43:41-04:00February 24th, 2020|Island History, News|

Mystic Isle underway and approaching Silver Eel Cove Remembering the Mystic Isle We Fishers Islanders love our ferries, and those of us who are “of a certain age” wax particularly poetic over the M/V Mystic Isle, remembered fondly from our childhoods with its red leather seats, muraled walls and quirky onboarding midship. It

Island History: Pirates in Our Region

By |2020-05-16T13:56:52-04:00June 5th, 2019|Island History, Newsletter, Newsletter 2019|

Island History: Pirates in Our Region by Pierce Rafferty On Block Island On July 12, 1690, the residents of Block Island were alarmed when a small fleet—consisting of one bark, one ketch, two sloops and smaller craft—appeared off their coast. Although the vessels were flying English colors, there was no certainty of their allegiance to

A Generous Donation from the Charles B. Ferguson Family

By |2020-05-16T12:00:12-04:00May 25th, 2018|Gifts, Island History, Newsletter, Newsletter 2018|

Charlie Ferguson posing with Tedwyns Tailagan, Field Trials, Fishers Island, 1931 A Generous Donation from the Charles B. Ferguson Family In the period following Charlie Ferguson’s death on January 7, 2018, his family searched through his many possessions for objects, books and creative works that were a good fit with the Museum’s various

Island History: The Great Hurricane of 1938

By |2020-05-30T00:41:43-04:00May 25th, 2018|Island History, Newsletter, Newsletter 2018|

Water surging over Money Pond during the hurricane. From The Henry L. Ferguson Museum Newsletter 2018 The following account of the 1938 Hurricane’s effect on Fishers Island was found in the Museum’s files. It was unsigned. Please contact the Museum if you are able to identify the author. Please note that September 21,

Island History: Fishers Island Ferries

By |2020-05-16T20:44:19-04:00May 25th, 2018|Island History, Newsletter, Newsletter 2018|

M.V. Islander after conversion for service in World War II. by Polly Edmonds Director’s note: The following account of ferry transportation in the 1940s is from the December 1967 issue of “Polly’s Letter,” a newsletter distributed by realtor, shop owner, and Ferry Commissioner Polly Edmonds. It was sent out semi-annually from 1964 until

Island History: Going to Isabel Beach, Anyone?

By |2020-04-14T20:11:29-04:00May 23rd, 2017|Island History, Newsletter, Newsletter 2017|

The Museum has sought for years to locate details on the shipwreck that gave Isabella Beach its name. .  . Henry L. Ferguson’s history of the island, “Fishers Island, N.Y.: 1614-1925,” published in 1925, had only the sketchiest reference to the wreck: “The schooner Isabella Blake, after which the beach is named, went ashore in

Battery Wooster, former site of two 8-inch disappearing guns, Fort Mansfield, Napatree Point, R.I. , circa 2011. Photo by John Leuba.

ANNUAL EXHIBITION 2020

The Coastal Forts of Eastern Long Island Sound: Abandonment, Ruination and Repurposing.
Now Open!
 

Subscribe to our e-News

Sign-up to get the latest news and update information. Don't worry, we won't send spam!